Cantastic! Meyer Lemon Marmalade Recipe

Jar Labels Hang Tags

This marmalade is the perfect consistency – not too thick, not too thin. Meyer lemons have a sweet, fragrant flavor and a thin skin with very little white; this is why, of all lemons, they make the best marmalade! This recipe makes a wonderful sweet and tart accompaniment for toast or croissants, and it can also be used as a glaze for broiled meats or seafood. With your custom-designed labels on the jars, your homemade lemon marmalade becomes a treasured gift for the food lovers in your life.

Ingredients:
• 3-1/4 pounds of Meyer lemons, unblemished, organic
• 5-1/4 cups water
• 12-1/2 cups sugar
• 1 box MCP pectin
• 1/2 teaspoon butter

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Equipment:
• Sixteen 8-ounce jam jars and two-piece lids
• 8 quart cook pot or larger
• long-handled wooden spoon
• ladle
• rubber gloves
• paper towels

Place the lids in a pan of water and simmer for 10 minutes; keep them immersed until ready to use. Wash screw caps and set near your work area. Place a clean towel on your counter where you will fill the jars. Wash jars in the dishwasher or place in a large water-filled pot and bring to a boil, then simmer for ten minutes. Leave in dishwasher or in pot until ready to fill. Cut 5 or 6 small squares of paper towel to use for cleaning the jar rims. Measure sugar into a bowl, set aside.

Wash the lemons, carefully slice into thin rounds, peel and all, and discard seeds. Put the lemon slices, juice, and pulp, into the cook pot. Add water. Bring to a boil and simmer for ten minutes. Take off heat, sprinkle the Sure-Jell pectin powder over the surface, and stir till mixed in. and Add the butter – this helps keep it from boiling up too high, then bring to a full rolling boil (a boil that cannot be stirred down), stirring constantly,  Pour in the pre-measured sugar, and stir constantly until it returns to a full rolling boil. Continue to stir and cook at full rolling boil for exactly 4 minutes. During this time, place the drained jars on the prepared towel, put on your rubber gloves, and make sure your ladle, paper towel squares, lids and screw caps are ready. After 4 minutes, take the marmalade off the heat and immediately pour into the hot jars, fill to within 3/8” of the top. Wipe jar rims with a clean, damp paper towel. Immediately put lids on and screw down very tight. Turn jars upside down with a little shake to distribute fruit, then turn upright after 5 minutes, again with a little shake. When cool, rinse off any marmalade residue with cool water.

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For small mouth jars, use shape 12 round labels. For large mouth jars, use shape 11 round labels. Add a tag for a little extra style.

Jeanne Williamson (138 Posts)

Jeanne and her husband David launched My Own Labels in January of 2000. It was a spin-off of their successful graphic design firm, plus it allowed Jeanne to incorporate her love of baking, making, sewing and creating. Today David and Jeanne continue to be the heart of the operation both creatively and practically.


8 Comments

  1. “Wash the lemons, then carefully slice into thin rounds (peel and all), and discard seeds. Put the lemon slices, and any juice and pulp, into a large cook pot. Sprinkle the MCP pectin powder over the lemon slices, and stir constantly until mixture comes to a full rolling boil (a boil that cannot be stirred down). ”

    There is no liquid? Or is this just with the juice from the lemons?

    • It has been several years since I made this marmalade and I don’t remember adding water. I am very careful to write my recipes correctly, so I would trust the recipe – but I do make mistakes! All considered I would cautiously say no added water. I want to make another batch to confirm, since in checking other recipes for Meyer lemon marmalade, I find they call for added water. However Meyer lemons are not as easy for me to come by as they were. My beloved godmother, Colleen, is no longer with us, and it was from her Meyer lemon tree so loaded with lemons, that I harvested fruit for my marmalade. Now I have to buy them from the store, and right now I am in a small town where Meyer lemons can’t be gotten, so I can’t make this marmalade today. I will be able to make some in the next two weeks and will get back to you then. In the meantime, if you make it per my recipe, please let me know how your marmalade turned out – and how many jars you got from it!

      – Jeanne Williamson

    • Hello! As promised I made another batch of Meyer lemon marmalade, because of your question about adding water. The new batch turned out perfect, and absolutely delicious! As I was making it, I could tell that my original recipe left out the water, so I have updated the post with the water added, other slight adjustments, and additional details. Enjoy your cooking in the kitchen, and please tell me how your marmalade turns out! – Jeanne Williamson

  2. Two questions. How many 8 oz. jars are needed for this recipe and do you add any liquid to the lemons and MCP Pectin powder?

    • Thank you for your interest in my Mayer lemon marmalade recipe! Hopefully the responses below will answer your questions.

      How many 8 ounce jars does this recipe make?
      I don’t know, but I do remember it makes a lot. I would prepare 10-12 jars. Also do a visual estimate of how much is in your pot before bringing it to a boil, and prepare more jars if needed. You want to have more jars than you need!

      Do you add water to this recipe?
      It has been several years since I made this marmalade and I don’t remember adding water. I am very careful to write my recipes correctly, so I would trust the recipe – but I do make mistakes! All considered I would cautiously say no added water. I want to make another batch to confirm, since in checking other recipes for Meyer lemon marmalade, I find they call for added water. However Meyer lemons are not as easy for me to come by as they were. My beloved godmother, Colleen, is no longer with us, and it was from her Meyer lemon tree so loaded with lemons, that I harvested fruit for my marmalade. Now I have to buy them from the store, and right now I am in a small town where Meyer lemons can’t be gotten, so I can’t make this marmalade today. I will be able to make some in the next two weeks and will get back to you then. In the meantime, if you make it per my recipe, please let me know how your marmalade turned out – and how many jars you got from it!

      – Jeanne Williamson

    • Hello! As promised I made another batch of Meyer lemon marmalade, because of your question about adding water. The new batch turned out perfect, and absolutely delicious! As I was making it, I could tell that my original recipe left out the water, so I have updated the post with the water added, other slight adjustments, and additional details. Enjoy your cooking in the kitchen, and please tell me how your marmalade turns out! – Jeanne Williamson

  3. What is the shelf life of this recipe after canning without a hot water bath? Is there any reason to not use one to prolong shelf life?

    • Good morning, and thank you for your interest in my lemon marmalade recipe!
      There is no reason NOT to use the water bath process after making this marmalade. My jams, jellies, and marmalades last for years without using the water bath process, as long as my canning process is sterile and hot enough to create a strong seal. However, for extra protection it does not hurt to use the water bath process.
      I hope this helps, and please let me know how your marmalade turns out!
      – Jeanne Williamson

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